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Notorious Billionaire Wang Sicong Exposed For Abusive Texts to Influencer

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Known as “the country’s husband,” Wang Sicong is the son of one of China’s richest men. With 41 million followers on Weibo, Wang embraces his amateur social critic and playboy persona, hanging with celebrities and throwing lavish parties — now, though, Wang is in the spotlight for something more serious.

A series of abusive WeChat messages from Wang posted by Douyin livestreamer Sun Yining have captured the attention of social media. In the messages, Wang shoots his shot, pestering Sun with lines like “I miss you so much I can’t sleep.”

When these lines receive no response, Wang grows increasingly frustrated and aggressive.

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In the texts, Sun informed Wang that she identifies as a lesbian. But Wang’s response was to gaslight her, stating “You should ask yourself if you really like men or women. This is China, so people will obviously favor a heterosexual woman over a lesbian. You are shutting the door to so many opportunities.”

Sun’s accounts have been suspended, and discussion around both individuals has been wiped from Weibo. 

When Sun’s posts first surfaced online, media outlets and netizens dug into her past looking to justify Wang’s obsessive behavior. Wang in turn accused Sun of misleading the public, sharing his own screenshots of their chat history. Most commenters, though, condemned Wang for his tactless messages.

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“Sun Yining is clearly the victim in this incident. Everyone should be able to empathize with her and understand how scared she must be,” reads one Douban post. “See Wang for who he is — someone who abuses his wealth, power and status.”

In the aftermath of the incident, previous misogynist remarks from Wang are starting to resurface. As China’s #MeToo movement continues to gain momentum, the public is less willing to look the other way when it comes to instances of abuse.

Cover Image Via Depositphotos

Lola Yang
    Born in Beijing and raised in Canada, Lola currently studies Asian Studies and English at the University of Michigan. She is an aspiring journalist with a deep interest in East Asian cultures and media.