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Daily Drip

University Cafeteria Draws Criticism Over “Girl’s Meal”

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A cafeteria at Sun Yat-sen University has drawn criticism online, after it was discovered that students were being served different meals based on their gender.

The meals for male and female students were found to differ in both portion size and price — male students paid 12 RMB (about $2 USD), while female students paid 11 RMB. The male lunch had two eggs, while the female lunch was smaller with just one egg.

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The major public university is located in Guangdong, China, where a staff member confirmed that the reports were true, and were being rectified.

“I’ll just ask for less myself, and give you the same amount of money,” reads one top-rated comment.

“These people aren’t just profiteers,” reads another. “They’re deliberately provoking gender division.”

The news comes alongside separate outrage on Weibo over issues faced by women attending university.

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In Fuzhou, a women’s college football team suffered a loss when they were forced to play with fewer than seven players, due to a controversial ruling around dyed hair.

Official rules prohibit players with dyed or permed hair from participating, which resulted in one team’s mad dash for a hair salon to purchase black hair dye in the moments before the game. But in the match, the referee ejected the player on the grounds that her hair was “not black enough.”

“Why not bind your feet? It’s an old tradition, after all,” wrote one user about so-called traditional aesthetics.

Adan Kohnhorst
Adan Kohnhorst is a Shanghai-based writer, producer, and multimedia artist, and the Associate Editor at RADII. His work has been featured in publications such as Maxim and the Chinese-language StreetVoice, and he’s an active member of the hip hop and DIY music scenes in Shanghai, NYC, and Dallas. He learned Mandarin in high school so he could train at the Shaolin Temple, but now just uses it to interview rappers. He blogs about China and Asia on Instagram: @this.is.adan