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Daily DripEntertainment

Watch This Screening of Queer Films from the Chinese Diaspora

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In China, onscreen same-sex romances are more common than ever before — however, organizing events and community around queer film is still a challenge.

That doesn’t mean that there’s a dearth of Chinese LGBT stories on the silver screen, though. Get your fix from June 12-19th, as Montage presents To Qu Yuan With Love, an online screening of queer films created by the Chinese diaspora.

Even better, Montage are offering RADII readers a 20% discount on the site with the code “RADIICHINA” for all of their premium content.

 

The event, which also includes this discussion panel, is curated by LGBT activist and director Fan Popo.

“Today, most LGBTQ+ terms in common Chinese and in international usage derive from western-centric theories,” said Fan. “For those of us within the queer Chinese diaspora, how should we understand the intersections of racial and gender identity and sexual orientation in contemporary society? How do we honor our traditions while adapting to globalization?”

The “To Qu Yuan With Love” Collection

Beer! Beer! (2019)

Tao, a Chinese man in Berlin, meets a German local, Sebastian. The film is billed as an “anti-romantic comedy.”

The Last Lesbian (2018)

Set in 2318, the world’s last lesbian must travel back in time to stop a chain reaction that yielded a large-scale operation to exile the gay population to outer space.

Red Light (2013)

A Dutch boy’s night on the town in Amsterdam leads to an unexpected encounter with a sex worker who shows him something he could never have imagined.

My German Boyfriend (2004)

The oldest film on the list, My German Boyfriend tells the story of a Chinese-Canadian man trying to find his ideal boyfriend in Berlin. The film is described as “a comedy of mistaken cultural identities, a diary of immigrant isolation, and a love letter to a boyfriend who might have been.”

Tune in for these films and others, curated by Fan Popo here. Use the code RADIICHINA to get 20% off the films until June 19th.

Related:

In China, Queer Film Events Quietly Push for Education and Acceptance

Cover image courtesy of Montage

Brian Smelzer
    Brian grew up in New York City and studied political science at Marymount University. He became fascinated by Chinese culture in high school, and in college began exploring Mandarin, loose leaf tea, and modern China behind the headlines.