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Daily Drip

Lego Unveils Chinese New Year Temple Fair and Lion Dancers for Spring Festival 2020

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After the Spring Festival dinnerdragon dance troupe, and dragon boat race sets,  Lego has two new China-focused creations coming our way for Spring Festival 2020: a lion dance troupe and a bustling festival complex. We were kind of hoping for a full Journey to the West set, but we’ll take these for now.

The lion dance set seems kind of an obvious go-to after the dragon dance one for the Year of the Pig, but when put together with the Spring Festival-time temple fair offering it looks pretty exciting. That’s how they’re marketing the sets — recognizing that they probably look more impressive as a combination — as this image (from Lego’s official Weibo account) shows:

lego chinese new year temple 2020

You can see the temple fair up top there, also from the account, and this is the lion dancer set:

And here’s a video exploring both of the Spring Festival 2020 sets in a bit more detail:

Take my money. 

The new additions come with plenty of festival trappings and crowd-pleasing Chinese characteristics such as new years greetings banners hanging on trees, fireworks, a shadow puppet show, mantou, and a toy panda for sale at one of the temple fair stalls. There’s also a guy dressed as a rat to go with the “pig man” figure from 2019.

Related:

The Chinese New Year Lego Sets You’ve Been Waiting For Are Now Here

The two sets were unveiled as part of the China International Import Expo trade fair that’s currently shutting down parts of Shanghai. They’re due out on December 26, one month before we enter the Year of the Rat, and as with the previous “Chinese festival special edition” sets are likely to only be sold (officially) in select Lego stores in Asia. Update: Scratch that. Lego have seen the error of their regional exclusivity ways; the official announcement makes clear that the sets will be available worldwide from January 10. Very exciting.

Jake Newby
Jake Newby is a Shanghai-based writer and editor with more than a decade's experience living and working in China. Previously managing editor of Time Out Shanghai, he's also written for publications such as South China Morning Post and the Financial Times.