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Daily Drip

Chinese Netizens Cry “Hands Off Women’s Bodies” After Call for Fewer C-Sections

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Recently, several US states have passed regressive restrictions on women’s control of their bodies. Over the pond, Chinese netizens are protesting what they see as a similarly regressive call by the National Health Commission for fewer Caesarean section (C-section) procedures.

At a press conference in Beijing, director Qin Geng announced that the Commission would strive to control C-sections deemed “unnecessary,” in order to encourage more women to give birth naturally.

This sparked an outcry online, particularly among women, and caused the hashtag, “Reduce C-section surgery” (#减少非性剖产产手术#) to start trending on Weibo.

Image: Weibo

On a Weibo post by China News Weekly, one upvoted comment reads: “Let’s keep researching ways for men to give birth, then.”

Images: Weibo

Writes another netizen: “Why is it that women’s reproductive freedom is decided by a group of men? How ridiculous!” Another directly refers to Alabama’s abortion ban, saying: “These lightweight men remind me of American abortion lawmakers!”

Image: Weibo

A male user chimes in: “I don’t listen to this nonsense. I just listen to what my wife wants, it’s up to her.”

Others pointed out the clear health risks, pain and scarring borne by women who opt for C-section surgery, as well as many women’s lack of anaesthesia and other means to ensure painless childbirth.

Related:

Wǒ Men Podcast: “Sitting the Month” – Postpartum Confinement in China

China has a higher rate of C-sections than the global average, at about 35% percent of births, but still follows a worldwide trend of increasing C-sections. Women in China have also had legal access to services such as abortion and contraception since before the enactment of China’s one-child policy, which make restrictions on reproductive health a hot topic of discussion for many.

Mayura Jain
    Mayura Jain is a Shanghai-based writer, editor, illustrator and designer originally from Los Angeles. Before joining RADII as Life Editor, she worked for City Weekend Shanghai and Sixth Tone as both an editor and graphic designer. In her spare time she frequents art exhibitions, fosters cats, and chows on unhealthy vegetarian food.

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